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BCC dedicates building in memory of a former president


Source Date: October 25, 2012



Friday, October 26, was a special day in the life of Bladen Community College. The College held a ceremony dedicating the Allied Health Building to the memory of its second president Lynn Grey King, who died last December. The ceremony was held in front of the building, which was constructed and completed shortly before Mr. King retired in June 1997. The name of the building is now the Lynn Grey King Allied Health Building.

The ceremony began with BCC President Dr. William Findt welcoming the group in attendance. Among officials in attendance were Congressman Mike McIntyre, State Representative William Brisson, Chairman of the Bladen County Commissioners and BCC Trustee Charles Ray Peterson, Mayor of Dublin Horace Wyatt, Mayor of Elizabethtown Sylvia Brisson, and others. Elizabethtown Town Manager and State Board of Community Colleges member Eddie Madden, and others. All members of Mr. King's immediate family also attended the ceremony.

Mayor Horace Wyatt was the first to comment, bringing greetings from the community. Others who followed included Elizabethtown Mayor Sylvia Brisson, Commissioner Chairman Charles Ray Peterson, and BCC Board Chairman Hayes Petteway.

BCC faculty member Nash Hester, who has been an employee of the College for more than 35 years, gave a moving presentation on how Mr. King's leadership over the years had shaped the College and set the tone for others emulate.

Hester stated that the purpose of his presentation was to explain what Mr. King meant to the faculty and staff of the College. With personal accounts, he talked about his early relationships with Mr. King as a student in the seventh grade. How Mr. King had impressed on him the value of extra effort and not giving up.

"When he came to Bladen Community College, I knew he would do a great job," Hester said. Hester stated that when he recalled what Mr. King meant to the faculty and staff of the College, six words came to mind. He listed those words as fairness, consideration, diligence, conscientious, inspirational and Christian.

In talking about how Mr. King inspired others, he said, "Mr. King was an inspiring person. He inspired you to want to be and do your best, regardless of the undertaking."

Referring to the fact that Mr. King lived a Christian life, Hester said, "His actions made you believe that Mr. King wanted to treat you as he would want to be treated himself. He had an underlying faith that influenced everything he did."

He concluded by saying, "To have known and worked with Mr. King was a privilege and honor."

After these remarks, Lynn Grey King Jr., son of the former president and a current staff member at the College, expressed his appreciation to those who attended the event. He pointed out that his father, who had been a dedicated supporter of the college for much of his life, would have been proud that the college had chosen to name the Allied Health Building in his memory.

Lynn Grey King was among the leaders in the county who had led the effort to bring a technical college to Bladen County. When the college was established, he was appointed to the original Board of Trustees and served on the board for the next 18 years. When he was selected by his fellow trustees to become the College's second president, he was serving as chairman of the board.

Mr. King served as the College's president for 12 years before retiring. During his tenure as president the College prospered and several new buildings were added, including the Allied Health Building.

Shortly after the death of Mr. King last year, the College's Board of Trustees began discussing how to best recognize the former president's many contributions to the institution that he led in various roles during a crucial period. The trustees made the decision to rename the Allied Health Building in memory of Mr. King earlier this year.



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